White moose

The first white moose was seen - as far as we know - in the early 1900s. An example from this area could be seen at the Museum of Nature history in Stockholm from 1927.

The white moose in this part of the world, is not an albino. As hunters avoid shooting them, they are growing in number and are more easily seen in the forest. Many mooses are white with dark parts, or vice versa. It is possible to hire a local Safari guide that can take you to where they can be seen.

The white moose in Värmland has become an international celebrity since our Mayor Hans Nilsson captured the white moose on August 11, 2017 on a film sequence that has become a viral success all over the world.

The moose bull caught on the film is completely white and also have a white soft velvet-like coating on the horns. But why is the Swedish moose completely white? Although the moose is white, it is not an albino, but it is said that the rare color comes from a genetic mutation. Albinism is a congenital condition that leads to loss of pigment and is found in both animals and humans and also results in bright or pink-red eyes.

In order not to disturb the moose, landowners and traffic in the area where the moose often lives, we ask everyone who wants to look at the white moose to show a little extra consideration.

White moose

White moose